The Pribiag group's research applies innovative nanofabrication and low-temperature measurement techniques to uncover the electronic properties of new low-dimensional material systems. Our work is driven both by the potential to uncover fundamental properties of quantum materials and by the desire to develop quantum devices with emergent physical properties that could enable future computing paradigms.


Our emphasis is on 2D and 1D materials that host topological states of matter or exhibit unusual spin and superconducting properties. Some of these materials are particularly promising for the development of future computing and communication technologies that will embrace the laws of quantum mechanics to overcome the limitations of what is possible within the existing (“classical”) paradigm.

2D Topological Materials and Devices

We are interested in the physics and applications of novel quantum states of matter that can only be observed in low-dimensional materials. A large part of our work focuses on topological phases in two dimensions. These represent a recent paradigm shift in our understanding of phases of matter, and could have a transformative impact on computing technologies. In this context we pursue two main directions:...

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Electronic Transport in Complex Oxides

Correlated electron materials pose some of the most intriguing problems in modern condensed matter physics. These materials host a wide range of exotic properties, including high-Tc superconductivity, magnetism and tunable metal-insulator transitions. A fascinating consequence of strong electron correlations is the emergence of quasi-two-dimensional quantum phases at the interfaces between transition metal oxides. The canonical example is the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system, which has attracted tremendous interest because the interface hosts a high-density 2DEG...

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Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Nanowires

Low-dimensional semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling open up avenues for exploring novel spin physics. A prime example are InSb nanowires, which have large spin-orbital coupling and g-factors of ~50. Using InSb nanowires, we have demostrated that the spins of individual electrons confined to quantum dots along the wire can be controlled using only rf electric fields (at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft). The narrow bandgap of InSb (~200 meV) has enabled us to tune between electron a...

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